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Wrap it up: Making Jobsites More Attractive


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Photo courtesy of sitesmart.com.au

Adorning construction sites across the country – sometimes so precise in their design that they aren’t noticeable – are large-scale printed wraps. Often, these are replicas of the image of the building. Other times, the printed wrap will have advertising or branding for the new site that is being built. In any case, they are a handy solution to ensure jobsites are more aesthetically pleasing to the community during the long construction process.

Chances are you may not have paid much attention to printed construction wraps. However, walking down any urban street these days, there’s probably a range of different printed wraps covering jobsites’ scaffolding.

“People don’t want to see ugly scaffolding. Printed wraps allow the jobsite to have the least visual impact to the community."

Andrew Doenicke, Sales and Marketing Director at Mesh Direct, oversees the planning, designing, production, and installation of these printed construction wraps as part of Mesh Direct’s offering. He says that when it comes to the wraps, their core purpose is to protect the visual amenity of the particular locale where people are living.

“People don’t want to see ugly scaffolding. Printed wraps allow the jobsite to have the least visual impact to the community. We are seeing local councils driving for it more and more, as they have stricter policies around what can and can’t be done with the visual aspects of jobsites,” he says.

Street Appeal

Doenicke believes that from a community perspective, printed wraps are important because they make a person feel better about where they live. From a builder and developer perspective, a designed wrap can lend them a heightened legitimacy.

“It shows the developer cares about where the community is going. It’s a concept that has been embraced by the construction and printing industries alike to deliver excellent designs that are unique, look fantastic, and that the community likes,” he says. “Time invested upfront to make sure the design is right has big benefits.”

Doenicke cites a Mesh Direct project as an example: the construction wrap on the Gowings Building in Sydney. The printed wrap perfectly replicated the façade of the building, even though underneath were just the bones of scaffolding.

“If you were a hundred metres down the road, you couldn’t tell it was a printed wrap at all. And that was during a year and a half of construction.”

More to Prints than Design

Separate to the benefits from a design and visual perspective, printed wraps on construction sites can assist with advertising. New developments can elect to advertise across the printed wrap, or demonstrate their commitment to a particular cause. Doenicke says this can include a developer wishing to show their patronage of local art by showcasing an artwork on the wrap, or to demonstrate their dedication to eco and green causes.

“We are seeing development companies putting more effort and time into investing in printed wraps as a genuine outdoor media component."

“We are seeing development companies putting more effort and time into investing in printed wraps as a genuine outdoor media component, or as part of their marketing campaign, incorporating development slogans and logos to build brand awareness during the build,” he says.

Additionally, printed wraps on scaffold components can add to a protective element from an OHS perspective. On the flipside, however, Doenicke warns that the installation process must be highly accurate to avoid weather-related disasters.

“It’s essential that printed wraps are installed correctly,” Doenicke says. “It’s not about simply sticking it up with cable ties. These wraps have to handle a hundred kilometre per hour winds, and on high-wind areas such as docking areas, this is crucial for the safety of the jobsite.”

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