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Environmental Rollbacks will Speed Plant


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Photo courtesy of Mike De Sisti/ Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Latest on conservationists' reaction to a bill that would eliminate environmental protection regulations for a Wisconsin Foxconn plant (all times local):

12:40 P.M.
Gov. Scott Walker's administration says a bill that would exempt a potential Foxconn electronics plant from environmental regulations would streamline the construction process.

Walker introduced a $3 billion incentives package for the plant on Friday. The legislation eliminates a number of key environmental compliance requirements for Foxconn, including the need to obtain state permits to fill wetlands and environmental impact statements.

Conservationists lined up Monday to oppose the bill. Walker's office referred a request for comment to the state Department of Natural Resources, a Walker cabinet agency.

DNR spokesman Jim Dick said in an email that the bill is about streamlining the process and since Foxconn hasn't said where the plant will be built no one knows if any wetlands will be affected.

11:55 A.M.
Conservationists are lining up to oppose Republican plans to eliminate key environmental regulations as part of an incentive package to lure a $10 billion Foxconn electronics plant to southeastern Wisconsin.

Gov. Scott Walker's incentives bill would exempt the company from environmental impact statements and state permits for filling wetlands and building on lake beds.

Midwest Environmental Advocates attorney Sarah Geers said Monday the bill would leave people in the dark about how the plant would affect the landscape and result in the loss of wetlands.

Clean Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Environment Research and Policy Center and the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters all oppose the bill as well.

A Walker spokesman referred questions to the Department of Natural Resources. An agency spokesman didn't immediately respond to a message.

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