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Daily Drill: Norwegian Wood, Power Dirt, and NY Harbor's Ferris Wheel


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Photo courtesy of Practical Engineer

BIG Makes Big Statements

BIG architectural statements have defined this firm, and it has received both praise and criticism for its design audacity. The Danish firm BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group) is based in Copenhagen, and over the past 7 years has made a reputation for itself as a deliberate innovator. These attention-grabbing structures are usable creativity in action. Yes, I'd like the tour...

Northernmost Wood Construction Project Makes a Great Statement 

At a latitude some 600 miles north of the very top of Alaska, Ny-Ålesund, Norway is a hospitable little town on the island of Spitsbergen in Svalbard, Norway; population thirty-five. The place is so far north the sun doesn't set from April 18th to August 24th. A new research station being built there will be made of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT), whose properties of resilience make it the perfect material for the extreme conditions there; another bold strike for wood as an old world building material worth revisiting as a construction mainstay. Hang on, let me grab my coat...

New York's Staten Island Undergoes Construction Upgrade

NYC's Staten Island borough is not a part of the city that always comes to mind when outsiders are thinking of the Big Apple. Several showcase construction projects on the island in New York Harbor are about to change that. This blue-collar province of New York City is about to get a facelift. We'll wave to the Statue of Liberty as we pass...

These Mega Projects Around the World Will Make You Feel Ant-Like

Bridges, tunnels, towers, dams—it's a big world with a growing population whose needs can often only be met with enormous infrastructure projects. Evolving construction technologies allow us to build these things. To the uninitiated the sheer scale can be an eye-opener. Like I don't already feel tiny enough...

Dirt: The Final Frontier

Concrete, steel, brick; buildings are made out of hard stuff (not to get too technical about it). But engineers know how to give ordinary dirt the backbone it needs to offer serious structural support. If only it didn't look like...dirt. But that's been worked on, too. May I tour without smudging my new shoes?