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Anti-Pipeline Encampment to Move from Federal to Tribal Land

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BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The large encampment of Dakota Access oil pipeline protesters will move from federal land to tribal land in North Dakota.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II says the tribal council voted for 8-5 for the move to its reservation so that permanent structures can be built to protect protesters from winter weather. Archambault says he hopes the move will be done soon.

The tribal land is about two miles south of the current camp, which is on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property near the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball rivers and near where the four-state pipeline is being built.

Protesters do not have a federal permit to be on that land, but the federal agency had said it wouldn't evict them due to free speech reasons.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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